SINDROME DE PAGET SCHROETTER PDF

Venous thromboembolic disease VTED in the upper extremities is an infrequent entity, although its incidence has increased in relation to the use of central venous catheters. Its etiology can be primary idiopathic, spontaneous, due to effort or traumatic or secondary related to tumours, central venous catheters, etc. We present a case of primary venous thrombosis of the upper right extremity, also called the Paget-Schroetter syndrome. The clinical picture usually consists of pain in the affected extremity, frequently accompanied by edema and collateral circulation. Echography-Doppler frequently presents false negatives, and it is recommendable to carry out CAT, due to its greater specificity and for evaluating the neighbouring structures, although flebography continues to be the cardinal test for diagnosing this picture.

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It can be thought of as a venous equivalent of thoracic outlet syndrome. Patients present with symptoms and signs of an upper limb deep vein thrombosis i. Compression of the subclavian vein when it passes through the costoclavicular space is the most favored mechanism of thrombosis.

Various surrounding structures that lie in close proximity to subclavian vein, when it passes through the costoclavicular space, have been postulated to cause the compression. The presence of thrombus can be confirmed on ultrasound or venography. CT or MRI of the thoracic inlet is used to search for a cause of the extrinsic compression.

The thrombus is treated with anticoagulation and catheter-directed thrombolysis, after which surgical decompression is performed. Following surgical decompression, if there is residual venous stenosis on repeat venography, angioplasty of the lesion is performed. Stenting is avoided where possible due to the poor long-term patency rate, and must only be performed after surgical decompression otherwise the stent may be crushed or fractured.

The term Paget-Schroetter syndrome was first used by Hughes in 3. Please Note: You can also scroll through stacks with your mouse wheel or the keyboard arrow keys. Updating… Please wait. Unable to process the form. Check for errors and try again. Thank you for updating your details. Log In. Sign Up. Log in Sign up. Articles Cases Courses Quiz. About Blog Go ad-free. As of the latest update, Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge have made a breaking change to how file uploads are handled.

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Paget-Schroetter Syndrome: Review of Pathogenesis and Treatment of Effort Thrombosis

Archivos de Bronconeumologia http: www. Other types of articles such as reviews, editorials, special articles, clinical reports, and letters to the Editor are also published in the Journal. It is a monthly Journal that publishes a total of 12 issues, which contain these types of articles to different extents. All manuscripts are sent to peer-review and handled by the Editor or an Associate Editor from the team.

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Paget–Schroetter disease

Effort thrombosis, or Paget-Schroetter Syndrome, refers to axillary-subclavian vein thrombosis associated with strenuous and repetitive activity of the upper extremities. Anatomical abnormalities at the thoracic outlet and repetitive trauma to the endothelium of the subclavian vein are key factors in its initiation and progression. The role of hereditary and acquired thrombophilias is unclear. The pathogenesis of effort thrombosis is thus distinct from other venous thromboembolic disorders. Doppler ultrasonography is the preferred initial test, while contrast venography remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Computed tomographic venography and magnetic resonance venography are comparable to conventional venography and are being increasingly used.

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[Paget-Schroetter Síndrome Associated With Hyperhomocsyteinemia]

It can be thought of as a venous equivalent of thoracic outlet syndrome. Patients present with symptoms and signs of an upper limb deep vein thrombosis i. Compression of the subclavian vein when it passes through the costoclavicular space is the most favored mechanism of thrombosis. Various surrounding structures that lie in close proximity to subclavian vein, when it passes through the costoclavicular space, have been postulated to cause the compression. The presence of thrombus can be confirmed on ultrasound or venography. CT or MRI of the thoracic inlet is used to search for a cause of the extrinsic compression. The thrombus is treated with anticoagulation and catheter-directed thrombolysis, after which surgical decompression is performed.

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Paget—Schroetter disease , is a form of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis DVT , a medical condition in which blood clots form in the deep veins of the arms. The condition is relatively rare. The syndrome also became known as "effort-induced thrombosis" in the s, [3] as it has been reported to occur after vigorous activity, [4] though it can also occur due to anatomic abnormality such as clavicle impingement [5] or spontaneously. It may develop as a sequela of thoracic outlet syndrome. It is differentiated from secondary causes of upper extremity thrombosis caused by intravascular catheters. Symptoms may include sudden onset of pain, warmth, redness, blueness and swelling in the arm.

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